McLeod & Livingstone Family Tree

David Livingstone - The Weaver boy that became a Missionary - Photo.jpg

Dr David LivingstoneAge: 60 years18131873

Name
Dr David Livingstone
Name prefix
Dr
Given names
David
Surname
Livingstone
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Dr David Livingstone

Name
Dr David Livingstone
Source: S28273
Birth 19 March 1813 24 0
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Note: Born in Blantyre in 1813, David Livingstone was the son of a shopkeeper. He started work at the age …
Birth of a half-brotherNeil 3 Livingston(E)
1815 (Age 21 months)

Birth of a brotherHenry Livingstone
9 March 1816 (Age 2 years)

Birth of a brotherHenry Livingstone
1816 (Age 2 years)

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Birth of a half-brotherHenry Livingstone
9 March 1816 (Age 2 years)

Birth of a half-brotherHenry Livingstone
1816 (Age 2 years)

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Birth of a sisterJanet Livingstone
25 March 1818 (Age 5 years)
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Birth of a half-sisterJanet Livingston(E)
25 March 1818 (Age 5 years)

Death of a brotherHenry Livingstone
1819 (Age 5 years)

Death of a half-brotherHenry Livingstone
1819 (Age 5 years)

Death of a paternal grandfatherNeil Livingstone
1820 (Age 6 years)

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Birth of a brotherCharles Livingstone
28 February 1821 (Age 7 years)
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Birth of a half-brotherCharles Livingston(E)
28 February 1821 (Age 7 years)

Birth of a sisterAgnes Livingstone
16 April 1823 (Age 10 years)
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Birth of a brotherNeil Livingstone
1825 (Age 11 years)

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Birth of a half-sisterAgnes Livingston(E)
16 April 1825 (Age 12 years)

Death of a maternal grandfatherDavid Hunter
1834 (Age 20 years)

Marriage of a siblingJohn LivingstoneSarah Mc KenzieView this family
24 June 1835 (Age 22 years)
Marriage of a half-siblingJohn LivingstoneSarah Mc KenzieView this family
24 June 1835 (Age 22 years)
Birth of a son
#1
Robert Livingstone
9 January 1846 (Age 32 years)
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Birth of a daughter
#2
Agnes Livingstone
1847 (Age 33 years)
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Birth of a son
#3
Thomas Steele Livingstone
1849 (Age 35 years)
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Birth of a daughter
#4
Elizabeth Livingstone
1850 (Age 36 years)
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Marriage of a siblingCharles LivingstoneHarriet IngahamView this family
1850 (Age 36 years)

Death of a daughterElizabeth Livingstone
November 1850 (Age 37 years)

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Birth of a son
#5
William Oswell Livingstone
15 September 1851 (Age 38 years)
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Discovery 1853 (Age 39 years)
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Death of a fatherNeil Livingstone
10 February 1856 (Age 42 years)

Death of a fatherNeil Livingstone
1856 (Age 42 years)

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Marriage of a childWilliam Oswell LivingstoneKate AndersonView this family
1857 (Age 43 years)

Birth of a daughter
#6
Anna Mary Livingstone
10 November 1858 (Age 45 years)
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Note: http://www.gencircles.com/users/steveshawcross/1/data/6690.
Death of a wifeMary Moffet
27 April 1862 (Age 49 years)
Death of a sonRobert Livingstone
1864 (Age 50 years)
Cause: Killed in action in the American Civil War
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Death of a motherAgnes Hunter
18 June 1865 (Age 52 years)

Fact 1
Explorer/Missonary
yes

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Fact 2
Presbytarian
yes

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Death 30 April 1873 (Age 60 years)
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Burial 4 June 1875 (2 years after death)
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Title
Dr.
yes

Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
elder brother
16 months
himself
3 years
younger brother
2 years
younger sister
Janet Livingstone
Birth: 25 March 1818 29 5Blantyre, Lanark, Scotland
Death: 23 November 1895Edinburgh, Scotland
3 years
younger brother
2 years
younger sister
3 years
younger brother
Father’s family with Agnes Hunter - View this family
father
step-mother
half-brother
half-sister
15 years
elder brother
4 years
half-brother
14 months
younger brother
2 years
half-sister
3 years
half-brother
4 years
half-sister
Family with Mary Moffet - View this family
himself
wife
son
Robert Livingstone
Birth: 9 January 1846Mabotsa, South Africa
Death: 1864Salisbury, North Carolina, United States
2 years
daughter
3 years
son
2 years
daughter
20 months
son
7 years
daughter
… … + Mary Moffet - View this family
wife
step-son
son
Robert Livingstone
Birth: 9 January 1846Mabotsa, South Africa
Death: 1864Salisbury, North Carolina, United States
2 years
daughter
3 years
son
2 years
daughter
9 years
daughter

BirthS02776
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DiscoveryS28274
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NameS28273
Fact 1S02776
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Fact 2S02776
Fact 2S28273
DeathS28273
BurialS28273
Birth

Born in Blantyre in 1813, David Livingstone was the son of a shopkeeper. He started work at the age of 10 but nevertheless managed to educate himself and to study medicine and theology at Glasgow University to become a missionary doctor. Hearrived in Bechuanaland in 1841 and married the daughter of another missionary there. Livingstone began to explore uncharted areas of Africa and while mapping the upper Zambesi River he discovered the Victoria Falls.

Coming across the horrors of the slave trade, his books on African exploration were influential in bringing it to an end. It was on an expedition which started in 1865, after he had been in the bush for several years that H M Stanley of the NewYork Herald set out to find him in 1872 and greeted him with the immortal words "Dr Livingstone, I presume?"

Livingstone almost died several times from disease and attacks by wild animals but eventually succumbed from fever in 1873, having refused to return to Britain. His embalmed body was brought back by his black servants and was buried inWestminster Abbey.

Shared note

[Mcleod family tree.GED]

Dr. David Livingstone travelled through Africa. He put darkest Africa on the map and brought civilisation to the jungle. After him, the town of Livingstones in Nysasaland (Now Malawi) was named. Dr. Livingstone most famous of all the MacLeaysand a missionary like St. Moluag was buried in 1874 under a black slab in the nave of the Westminster Abbey.[Mcleod family tree111.GED]

Livingstone Memorial - Victoria Falls David Livingstone (1813-1873)

It was the mighty Zambezi which led missionary Dr. David Livingstone on his greatest and final adventure. In search of a means to access the interior, Livingstone tagged the Zambezi "God's highway" to the Indian Ocean and set off down the river,discovering the great cataract native Africans called Mosi-o-Tunya, "the smoke that thunders." Livingstone christened the great waterfall Victoria Falls after his queen. Today, the great chasm has lost none of it's allure, still considered oneof the great natural wonders of the world.

David Livingstone: African Explorer Few Europeans have contributed as much to the exploration of Africa as a gentle Scottish missionary named David Livingstone. Livingstone was a curious combination of missionary, doctor, explorer, scientist and anti-slavery activist. He spent 30 years in Africa, exploring almost a third of the continent, from its southern tip almost to the equator. Livingstone receiveda gold medal from the London Royal Geographical for being the first to cross the entire African Continent from west to east. He was the first white man to see Victoria Falls and though he never discovered the source of the Nile, one of hisgoals, he eliminated some possibilities and thereby helped direct the efforts of others.

Although popular among native tribes in Africa, Livingstone made enemies of some white settlers there because he learned African languages and had an unusually keen understanding and sympathy for native people and cultures. In 1843, whilesettling the Mabotsa valley, Livingstone shot a lion. Before it died, however, the lion attacked Livingstone, costing him the use of his left arm.

In 1865, at age 52, Livingstone set out on his last and most famous journey. He soon lost his medicine, animals and porters, but struggled on almost alone.

At a village on the Lualaba River he witnessed the slaughter of villagers by slave traders. The letter he sent home describing the event so infuriated the public that the English government pressured the Sultan of Zanzibar to stop the slavetrade. The pressure was only partially successful. The trans-Atlantic slave trade, organised by the Portuguese, had began around 1530. In 1562 Sir John Hawkins started the English slave trade, taking cargoes of slaves from West Africa to thenewly discov ered Americas. Find out more about the discovery of Africa by the Portuguese, and the discovery of the Americas by Christopher Columbus.

On Nov. 10, 1871 in the village of Ujiji, on the east side of Lake Tanganyika, Livingstone encountered Henry Stanley. He greeted him with his (now famous) comically understated words: "Dr Livingstone, I presume?". Stanley had been sent by theNew York Herald Tribune newspaper to help, but it had taken a year to find him.

With Stanley's supplies Livingstone continued his explorations, but he was weak, worn out and suffering from dysentery. Then, on the morning of April 30, 1872, his two African assistants found him dead, still kneeling at his bedside, apparentlypr aying when he died. They dried his body and carried it and his papers on a dangerous 11-month journey to Zanzibar, a trip of 1,000 miles. The natives buried his heart in Africa as he had requested, but his body was returned to United Kingdomand buried in Westminster Abbey.


MS Encarta Extract: Dr. David Livingstone (1813-1873), Scottish doctor and missionary, considered one of the most important European explorers of Africa, also pioneering the abolition of the slave trade. Livingstone was born in Blantyre. After completing hismedical c ourse in 1840, Livingstone was ordained and sent as a medical missionary to South Africa. In 1841 he reached Kuruman, a settlement founded by Scottish missionary Robert Moffat in Bechuanaland (now Botswana). In 1849 Livingstone crossedthe Kalahari Desert and became the first European to discover Lake Ngami. On another expedition (1852-1856), he followed the Zambezi River to its mouth in the Indian Ocean, thereby becoming the first European to discover Victoria Falls.

Livingstone's explorations resulted in a revision of all contemporary maps. He returned to Britain in 1856 and was welcomed as a great explorer. In 1866, after commanding a series of explorations, Livingstone led an expedition to discover thesour ces of the Nile River and explore the watershed of central Africa. Traveling along the Ruvuma River, Livingstone reached the shore of Lake Tanganyika in 1869. Little was heard from Livingstone during this period, and his welfare became a matter of international concern. In 1870 Livingstone traveled from Ujiji, on Lake Tanganyika, to the Lualaba River, in present-day Democratic Republic of the Congo(DRC, formerly Zaire), becoming the first European to visit that location. Upon his return to Ujiji, Livingstone was met by a rescue party led by Henry Morton Stanley, who is said to have greeted the explorer with the famous remark, "Dr.Livingstone, I presume?" Stanley and Livingstone explored the area north of Lake Tanganyika together. Later, Livingstone set out alone to continue his search for the sources of the Nile.


The Christian Missionary Perspective Mrs. J.H. Worchester writes in her book, David Livingstone: First To Cross Africa With The Gospel, that "as a missionary explorer, [Livingstone] stood alone, traveling 29,000 miles in Africa, adding to the known portion of the globe about amillio n square miles, discovering lakes N'gami, Shirwa, Nyassa, Morero and Bangweolo, the upper Zambesi and many other rivers, and the wonderful Victoria Falls. He was also the first European to traverse the entire length of Lake Tanganyika,and to trav el over the vast water-shed near Lake Bangweolo, and through no fault of his own, he only just missed the information that would have set at rest his conjectures as to the Nile's sources."

His attempts to abolish the slave trade, and to supplant it by introducing Christianity and "legitimate" commerce to Africa, remained a lifelong ambition, and he resolutely pursued this crusade until his death.

After hearing of his death, Florence Nightingale said: "God has taken away the greatest man of his generation...."

Livingstone was born on March 13, 1813, in Blantyre, Scotland, where he spent the first twenty-three years of his life. His parents, devout Christians, played an important role in his life by introducing him to the subject of missions.

As a young man, he worked in a local mill, but refused any thought of this becoming his destiny. By the time he turned twenty-one, Livingstone had accepted Christ and made up his mind to become a medical missionary.

He heard of Robert Moffat, a missionary to South Africa, tell of the work going on in Kuruman. Within eighteen months, he saved enough money to continue his education. After completing medical school, he accepted a position with the LondonMissiona ry Society in South Africa. And on December 8, 1840, he set sail for Kuruman.

A Coast To Coast Venture However, upon his arrival he was disappointed by the small population of Africans living in the region. He was determined to reach a larger population. A year later, he was granted permission to move 700 miles into the African interior toestablish another missionary station. Livingstone wasted no time setting things up at Mabotsa.

In 1845, he returned to Kuruman where he met and married Robert Moffat's daughter, Mary. Their marriage lasted eighteen years and witnessed the birth of four children.

Livingstone often took his family with him while crossing the African wilderness. Still, there were many times when they could not be together. The longest period of separation was for five years between November of 1853 and May 1856.Livingstone c ompleted one of the most amazing journeys ever undertaken - a coast to coast venture that covered four thousand miles of unexplored land, most of which was located along the Zambezi River.

Sorrow And Victory After an extended visit to United Kingdom, Livingstone and his wife began their last journey together. It was during this adventure that Livingstone faced the severest trial of his life; Mary died in 1862 from complications related to Africanfever.

Sorrow and discouragement plagued Livingstone: "It was the first heavy stroke I have suffered, and quite takes away my strength. I wept over her who well deserved many tears. I loved her when I married her, and the longer I lived with her Iloved her the more."

After several failed attempts to set up mission stations in the interior and along the coast, Livingstone concluded God was leading him in another direction. No European had ever ventured into North Africa. This would be his next goal and hisgreat est accomplishment for future missionary work. The charts and maps he left us changed the way we view Africa.

"I am a missionary, heart and soul," wrote Livingstone. "God had an only Son, and He was a missionary and a physician. A poor, poor imitation of Him I am, or wish to be." In this service I hope to live; in it I wish to die." No other person ha sdone more to further mission efforts than David Livingstone. He also raised in Europe so powerful a feeling against the slave trade that through him slavery may be considered as having received its death blow.

Marching inland in 1866, Livingstone reached Lake Nyasson on August 8 and began journeying north toward Lake Tanganyika. He wrote: "O Jesus, grant me resignation to Thy will, and entire reliance on Thy powerful hand...The cause is Thine. What ani mpulse will be given to the idea that Africa is not open if I perish now!..."

Livingstone was often weakened by bouts of African fever. Months rolled by and then years without the outside world knowing where he was. This is when a New York reporter, Henry Morton Stanley, accepted the challenge to "find Livingstone."

On November 10, 1871, Stanley's caravan, loaded with supplies, reached Ujiji, Africa. A thin, frail Livingstone stepped out to meet him as Stanley bowed, took off his hat, and spoke the now famous words, "Dr. Livingstone, I presume."

Beloved The World Over Livingstone was beloved and honored by the world. Yet when Stanley found him, he was weak and undernourished. The two quickly began a friendship. After Livingstone's death, it was Stanley who diligently worked to see missionaries serving in thela nd his friend had opened.

Death came to David Livingstone on April 30, 1873, after a long illness. His African companions reported they found him kneeling beside his bed where he had said his last earthly prayer. Though his heart remained in Africa, his body, along withhis belongings - papers and maps - was transported to Bagamoyo on the coast and then sent to United Kingdom, where he is buried in Westminster Abbey.

Africa from West to East The journey to Luanda took several months; they arrived there - in May, 1854 - a sorry party. Livingstone himself was ragged and emaciated, suffering from dysentery and with his mind so fogged that he could hardly remember his surname. KindlyPortuguese officials nursed him back to health, and a passage home was offered him in a British vessel in port at that time. the temptation must have been great, but this route was clearly no 'highway to the interior'; they must return toLinyanti.

The outward journey had been bad but the return journey, by almost the same route, was even worse. Torrential rain, malaria and rheumatic fever sapped Livingstone's energy, and tribes whose country he passed through were hostile; but the partypressed on until at least Linyanti was reached. After only a brief stop, and again with the help of Chief Sekeletu, Livingstone set out once more, heading eastwards following the valley of Zambesi. This time the going was much less difficult,and shortly Livingstone made what was perhaps the most spectacular discovery. Two years earlier, when he had first reached Sesheke, he had heard of a giant waterfall which the Africans called 'Mosi-oa-tunya' (the smoke that thunders). On 17November 1855, Livingstone had his first sight of the grandeur of the falls as the waters of the Zambesi tore headlong over the 1,600-metre-wide ledge, down into the chasm over 100 metres below. This was one of the few times that Livingstone putany name other than African ones on his map; he named the falls the 'Victoria Falls'. The long journey from there to the coast, although not uneventful, was safely accomplished; most of the way the party followed the Zambesi. Livingstone becameso certain that this was a navigable river which would provide a highway to the interior that at one point he made a diversion to reach the coast more quickly, and in so doing missed out that part of the river which he was later to find barredfrom navigation by the Kebrabasa Rapids.

Having crossed Africa from west to east, a journey of some 4,300 miles, mostly of foot - Livingstone was the first European to have done this - he set out by ship for United Kingdom, reaching home in 1856. The reception he received would surelyhave turned the head of a lesser man. Honours were conferred upon him, and no one was too distinguished to seek his friendship. Although reluctant to do so, Livingstone was persuaded to write a book. He put together his diaries and publishedthem under the title Missionary Travels; the book was an immediate best-seller.

Africa and its people had now become so much a part of him that Livingstone was impatient to return and continue the work he had begun. At every opportunity, and there were many, Livingstone pleaded the cause of Africa; he was anxious thatAfricans should benefit from European civilisation, and tried hard to persuade others to join in his work. He was particularly anxious to see the ordinary tradesmen - carpenters, builders, farmers and the like - go there as teachers pass ontheir skills, so that the Africans might learn new techniques in building better houses and raising better crops, and be able to enter the world's commercial markets. These first sixteen years in Africa had been under the auspices of the LondonMissionary Society but, while there was no great rift in the relationship, there was no doubt that some felt Livingstone had recently become too preoccupied with exploration to carry out the society's scheme of work. Hence Livingstone felt freeto accept appointment as leader of a government-sponsored expedition to explore the Zambesi and its tributaries.

On 12 march 1858, with his wife again beside him, and with other members of the expedition including Dr John Kirk and Charles Lvingstone, his brother, he sailed for the Cape in the steamer Pearl. Mrs Livingstone, in spite of the many hardshipsshe had endured, was not a robust person; illness overtook her on the voyage, causing her to stay at Cape Town while the others proceeded to the mouth of the Zambesi, where she would later join them. Tragedy and misfortune seemed to be thekeynote of this whole expedition. The Ma Robert, the boat on which Lvingstone had hoped to sail up the Zambesi, proved worthless; he called it 'an asthmatic tin can'. He discovered what he had bypassed on his first journey down the river - theimpassable barrier of the Kebrabasa Rapids - but he did not strike northwards to explore the Shire River and make important discoveries, including that of Lake Nyasa (known today as Lake Malawi).

At about this time he heard that, as a result of his appeal in Cambridge in 1857, the Universities Mission to the Shire Highlands had been founded. Soon afterwards a strong party, under the leadership of Bishop MacKenzie, arrived, but they wereinexperienced and had no medical personnel; a year later, Bishop MacKenzie and others had died of fever, and the mission was abandoned. Even greater personal tragedy was at hand for Livingstone; he and his wife had been reunited for only threemonths when Mrs Livingstone died of fever at Shupanga. It was a terrible blow for him; they had been deeply attached and Mary Moffat's heroic contribution had made a significant difference to his life and work.

One of Livingstone's great shortcomings was his inability as a leader of this expedition; he had worked too long with Africans as his companions - men whose instinct told them that they could trust in his judgement - and he had not let themdown. With his fellow Europeans, however, there soon arose a feeling of discontent; they did not want instructions without preliminary consultation and discussion. But Livingstone, always the 'dour Scot', did not seem to appreciate this, andexpected too much of their initiative without always making the task, or the purpose of it, clear to them. Charles Livingstone, his brother, came in for more criticism than he deserved from other members of the party, who considered himincompetent but shown favouritism by his elder brother.

LIVINGSTONE TOWN

Named after the famous Victorian missionary explorer, Dr. David Livingstone, the Town was established in 1905. As a major European settlement, the town was made the capital of Northern Rhodesia in 1911. As the capital, it enjoyed excellentfacilities far superior to anything in the country, as can be seen from the surviving Edwardian colonial buildings that line the city's main road, and even had the distinction of having the country's first newspaper.

The capital was moved to Lusaka in 1935 and the bustling city has become a quiet town, a little neglected but still retaining a special charm. The proximity to the Zambezi River and the spectacular Victoria Falls has led it to become a base fortravelers from all over the world wanting to explore this Seventh wonder of the World.

There are several Adventure Companies offering Riverboarding, White water rafting, Canoeing, Horse riding trails, Abseiling, local tours to the Victoria Falls and around Livingstone.

Note

A family tree How successive generations of the Moffatt family have served Africa Following the article on Robert Moffat in the January issue of EN, Dr. Malcolm Moffat, the grandson of Robert Moffat's grandson (see footnote) has kindly supplied us with details of how the Moffats' descendants have contributed and stillcontribute to Africa today. Dr. Malcolm Moffat worked as a paediatrician in Zambia and Uganda in a variety of roles including Makerere Medical School, before coming back to the UK National Health Service. He is now retired and lives near Edinburgh. His brother still farms in Zambia and is involved in pioneering a Christian secondary school there. Malcolm writes:

Robert and Mary Moffat had ten children, seven of whom survived into adult life and six of whom married. Many of their progeny have lived and worked in Africa. Some still do. Christian evangelism, agriculture and the care of the sick were three fields in which Robert Moffat laboured and left his mark in southern Africa. It is remarkable how many of his descendants have followed in his footsteps, though very few havemanaged to combine all three in one career as he did!

Livingstone's wife His eldest child, Mary, married Dr. David Livingstone, and their grandson (1) and great grandson (2) were both missionary doctors in Africa. The following generation boasted at least three medical graduates. Robert Moffat's biographer and younger son, John Smith Moffat, started his career as a missionary among Mzilikazi and the Matabele, and later entered government service in what later became Zimbabwe. In turn, two of his sons (3) had lifelongmedical careers in Uganda and South Africa. Two were Members of Parliament (4) and one (5) trained in agriculture and was later ordained by the Church of Scotland to pioneer a new mission field in Chitambo in Zambia (near to where David Livingstone died).

Bible translation Malcolm Moffat translated the Bible into a Zambian tribal language as his grandfather had done before him for the Botswana at Kuruman. His three sons (6) in turn spent their lives in agriculture, public service and politics. They supported the African's cause during the period leading up to Zambia's independence and the next two generations produced at least five doctors, twofarmers and two ordained ministers. Another of Robert Moffat's granddaughters (7) was the mother of a family of farmers, (8) and also of a Chief Justice (9) who resigned his post in protest during the ill-fated Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland. Yet another grandson was Prime Minister of Rhodesia when it was a crown colony, and his descendants include doctors, farmers and clergy. So today, the Christian legacy of Robert and Mary Moffat continues through those of his descendants who live and work as citizens of Zambia, Zimbabwe, Botswana and the new South Africa. And there are others . . . but there is no room to mentionthem all here.

Notes 1. Dr. Hubert Livingstone Wilson, Church of Scotland missionary in Malawi and Zambia. 2. Dr. David Livingstone Wilson, missionary in Zambia, subsequently Chief Medical Officer of Newcastle-on-Tyne, now retired.

  1. Dr. Robert Unwin Moffat, First Chief Medical Officer in Uganda Protectorate; H. Alford Moffat, FRCS, surgeon in Cape Town.

  2. Livingstone Moffat, farmer and Member of the South African Parliament; Howard Unwin Moffat, Prime Minister of Rhodesia.

  3. Malcolm Moffat worked as an agricultural missionary in Malawi (then Livingstonia), and later with David Kaunda (Kenneth's father) in pioneer missionary work in Northern Rhodesia.

  4. Unwin J. Moffat, agricultural officer and farmer; Sir John Moffat, Commissioner for Native Affairs and later leader of the Liberal party in Northern Rhodesia; Robert L. Moffat, MP, representing African interest in the Federal Government ofNorthern Rhodesia.

  5. Ruth Moffat married Sir Clarkson Tredgold.

  6. The Tredgold family still live in Zimbabwe.
  7. Sir Robert Tredgold. Mr Malcolm Moffatt © Evangelicals Now - June 1996 Please consider supporting this ministry by subscribing. << June 1996 >>
Note

http://www.rampantscotland.com/visit/blvisit_livingstone.htm

Note

Key events during the life of David Livingstone Year Event 1813 David Livingstone is born to a humble Scottish family. Obtains medical degree from Glasgow University. 1838 Accepted as a candidate by London missionary society. 1841 Arrives at Moffet's Missionary station in South Africa. 1844 Married Mary Moffet. Set up Mission station on the Limpopo River. 1847 Crossed the Kalahari Desert on an exploration trip to Lake Ngami. Moved with family to new mission station North of Kalahari. 1852 Traveled back to Cape town and sent wife and children back to Britain. 1853 Began first expedition to the interior, (Angola-Zambia-Mozambique). 1855 Discovered Victoria Falls on the Zambezi River. 1856 Completed first expedition, returned to Britain, published Missionary Travels. 1857 Resigned as a missionary in order to focus on exploration. 1858 Began four year official "Zambezi expedition", accompanied by wife . 1864 Recalled to Britain after death of wife, and other difficulties. 1866 Returned to Africa to seek source of the Nile. Discovered the Lualaba River. 1869 Met with H. M. Stanley in Ujiji. 1873 Died of Malaria in Zambia. His body was returned to Britain by his servants.

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Media objectlivingstone_slavery8032a.jpg
livingstone_slavery8032a.jpg
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Media objectlivingstone_stanley8033a.jpg
livingstone_stanley8033a.jpg
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Type: Photo